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Top 20 for 2011 on Audiotuts+

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We're almost at the end of a big year on Audiotuts+. I'd like to send out a huge thank you to our authors and the larger community. I've spent hours today exploring all we achieved in 2011, and I'm impressed. Out of everything we've posted this year, here are the Top 20 posts according to the interest of our readers.

We've posted 500 times this year. That makes this list the best 4% of our 2011 content. Congratulations to those authors who made the cut.

How was the list built? We collected every 2011 tutorial, quick tip and article that had ten comments or more, and sorted them according to how many visits they received in the first week. For good measure we took into account Facebook likes, star ratings, and traffic rankings for the year. The Top 20 posts in the list made the cut.

So here they are in order:

  • 4 Foolproof Ways to Make Your Home Studio Sound Better

    1. 4 Foolproof Ways to Make Your Home Studio Sound Better

    Author: Björgvin Benediktsson

    It’s easy to make music at your home today. However, you can’t put up low budget monitors and a microphone and call yourself a studio. There is a difference between a nice home recording studio – even if it’s just one spare room – and a low-cost corner in your bedroom, especially if you want to make money with it. We all start somewhere, even if it is in the corner of our bedroom but what separates the men from the boys is being able to take it to the next level. What follows are some of the foolproof ideas to make your home recording studio sound better.

  • 6 Different Frequencies and How to Spot Them

    2. 6 Different Frequencies and How to Spot Them

    Author: Björgvin Benediktsson

    I can never get enough information on EQ. I love to know how everybody EQed a certain vocal or drum sound to get that tight punch or shimmering highs so prominent in a mix. When you’ve mastered the EQ spectrum and you know where to go when you need to fix or embellish something, you are definitely ahead of the game.

    If you can listen to a sound and say to yourself, “Oh that needs a little more 250 Hz,” or “I think a cut at 1.2 would totally do the trick,” then you have something to be proud of. You are hearing something that nobody else around you hears. And that’s something to be proud of.

  • How to Create the ‘Like a G6′ Bassline Sound

    3. How to Create the ‘Like a G6′ Bassline Sound

    Author: Mike Elliott

    If you listen to the radio, go into upscale bars, or dance at the clubs you probably have heard Far East Movement’s ‘Like a G6′. Aside from the icy vocals from the artist Dev, G6 has a very memorable bass line. If you wanted to know how to recreate that sound for a remix or to have it as a sound option in your own track then read on like a G6!

  • Drum Compression: Get Your Attack and Release Times Correct

    4. Drum Compression: Get Your Attack and Release Times Correct

    Author: Jack Wiles

    Compression can be a tricky one to get your head around, and even if you’ve got your head around the threshold and ratio settings without the attack and release times being set correctly it will always be difficult to get the desired effect. This quick tip will outline a really handy trick I learned from a friend a few years ago which allows you to get your attack and release times just right. It’s primarily designed to work on drums but the same principles will apply to any percussive sound.

  • 5 Simple Ways to Add Punch to Your Drum Parts

    5. 5 Simple Ways to Add Punch to Your Drum Parts

    Author: Mo Volans

    In this tutorial we are taking a look at how to add punch, shine and edge to your drum parts. So whether you have a cool drum loop that lacks that certain something or an entire drum group that needs a lift, these simple steps should point you in the right direction.

  • 6 Simple Ways to Achieve Separation in Your Mix Downs

    6. 6 Simple Ways to Achieve Separation in Your Mix Downs

    Author: Mo Volans

    Creating a full, rounded and involving mix can be pretty challenging and one of the hardest bits is placing each instrument in it’s own defined space. Once you move past more than three or four elements there is always a danger of things becoming muddy. This is why we need to create separation.

    Ensuring that our instruments are clearly defined is not quite as hard as you may think. Like anything else in music production it really comes down to technique and experience. Let’s take a look at a list of ten things that should help you when completing your mixes.

  • Why You Should Use Metering Tools while Mixing and Mastering

    7. Why You Should Use Metering Tools while Mixing and Mastering

    Author: Björgvin Benediktsson

    Last AES convention I met a manufacturing rep for a very prestigious equipment company. He was demoing a piece of equipment for me, showing me all the great knobs and buttons that it had to offer. Then he said something along the lines of, “We don’t include a screen for these things since you’re supposed to mix with your ears.” That’s when I took my exit stage left. I think imposing a viewpoint like that is just plain wrong.

  • Dubstep for Beginners – Part 1: The Drums

    8. Dubstep for Beginners – Part 1: The Drums

    Author: Mike Elliott

    With three equally important focal points, this tutorial series will initiate you each of these areas of dubstep and how to start producing your own grooves. This first tutorial will focus around the drum beats and what makes the dubstep beats unique. Get ready for some head nodding grooves!

  • Quick Tip: How to Ensure Your Masters Are Not Overlimited

    9. Quick Tip: How to Ensure Your Masters Are Not Overlimited

    Author: Mo Volans

    More and more relative beginners are taking on their own mastering. This is great but if you plan to get the job done yourself there’s a few key things you should know before starting your first mastering sessions.

    One of the key things to look out for is the final level of your finished master and the amount of reduction to your music’s dynamic range. In most cases you will only need to look to your final limiter to address both of these issues. Let’s take a look.

  • Audiotuts+ Top 6 Software Synths

    10. Audiotuts+ Top 6 Software Synths

    Author: Adrian Try

    I remember discovering pro synths way back in 1982. I was amazed – with one instrument you could create almost any sound you could imagine. I fell in love with them. Now we can do all that with software.

    About a month ago I asked you what you thought was the best software synth. You answered. Five synths stood out above the rest. In this article we explore them.

  • How to Create a Wall of Acoustic Guitars

    11. How to Create a Wall of Acoustic Guitars

    Author: Björgvin Benediktsson

    This tutorial is going to teach you a nice technique on creating a thick wall of acoustic guitars in your mix. It’s not only a mixing tutorial but it cover both the recording and production process. We’ll be going over some music theory to create a layered guitar sound and then record it in such a way that we can create a shimmery wall of strummy acoustic guitars.

  • What Is the Best DAW for Beginners?

    12. What Is the Best DAW for Beginners?

    Author: Adrian Try

    If you’re getting started with audio production, it won’t be long before you have to start making decisions. These decisions will potentially cost you lots of time and money. And one of the first of these decisions is about software – which digital audio workstation (DAW) software should you choose?

  • A Basic Guide to Mixing and Mastering

    13. A Basic Guide to Mixing and Mastering

    Author: Hugo Tromp

    Mixing and mastering are the two base components of professional producing. Do you have a home studio and do you want to record your own instruments, such as the guitar, the piano and the drums to make an awesome track? This article provides all the knowledge considering mixing and mastering that you’ll need to produce your very own track!

  • Making Your MIDI Strings Even More Realistic

    14. Making Your MIDI Strings Even More Realistic

    Author: George Strezov

    As I said in my previous article Making a Convincing Melody with Sampled Orchestral Strings, one of the toughest things when making a MIDI mock-up is the string part. Sadly for me, since my last tutorial, I haven’t had the chance to try Hollywood Strings or LASS, so I’ll be doing this tutorial with my good old friend East West Quantum Leap Orchestra Complete, without blending different patches, using just one!

    So, before going to the tutorial, there is no point in lying to you. MIDI is always a temporary option. For us, the film composer guys, MIDI is a solution till the time we can record a live orchestra.

  • Tighter Vocals (Backing or Doubling) Using the Flex Tool

    15. Tighter Vocals (Backing or Doubling) Using the Flex Tool

    Author: James Arter

    The vocals are always the most important part of a mix. They sit right up front and are the main thing that the listener will latch on to. If they sound too lazy and loose, it can throw the whole track out and give an overall messy feel.

    Now, getting the vocalist to sing rhythmically and on-the-beat is one thing, but trying to get them to do that again for either a chorus double, or backing vocals, is another! When it comes to parts like this, that need to be spot-on, there’s something you can do in post-production to help the situation out. With the use of the Flex Tool, in Logic, I’ll show you a quick tip to do just that.

  • 20 Windows DAWs Worth Using

    16. 20 Windows DAWs Worth Using

    Author: Adrian Try

    Most of the world use Windows computers, so the chances are you’re one of them. So if you want to produce music on your computer, what are your options? Fortunately there are a heap of them – most of the big name digital audio workstation software works fine on Windows, and they’re not your only choices. So sit down and take a menu. We list the “big gun” software you can choose from, some inexpensive (less than $100) alternatives, and a few free options.

  • 20 Podcasts that Musicians Should Subscribe To (And Why!)

    17. 20 Podcasts that Musicians Should Subscribe To (And Why!)

    Author: Adrian Try

    Rather than listening to music as I drive, shave and garden, I regularly listen to podcasts. That way I’m not just being entertained, but educated as well. In this post we introduce you to the Top 20 podcasts musicians should subscribe to.

    A podcast is like a radio show, only distributed via RSS over the internet. Some are professionally produced, but many are done by amateurs. Most are about a particular interest or topic. And there are a ton of them on music and recording – some featuring indie music, others exploring music technology, and many explaining techniques for playing and recording music. In this article we’ll focus on the podcasts that teach you about producing music, and not the ones that help you discover new music. Maybe we’ll cover those in a future post.

  • Quick Tip: How To Get A Clean John Frusciante Tone

    18. Quick Tip: How To Get A Clean John Frusciante Tone

    Author: Adrian Figallo

    In this tutorial I’m going to show how to get that classic and iconic clean-Stratish tone using just modeling technology. I’m using Guitar Rig 4 to get it, but you could use whatever software or real amp, as long as it gives you a Marshall-like tone.

  • 3D Mixing Part 5: Creative Routing

    19. 3D Mixing Part 5: Creative Routing

    Author: Will Walker

    Sorry for the long delay in continuing this series. I just moved across the country which took a bit more time and effort than I had originally hoped. In getting back on track with this tutorial, we are going to begin to look at some interesting ways of setting up our mix routing to maximize our mix-down flexibility; allowing us to shape our sounds into something with a more personal and artistic feel. As with any artistic endeavor, many of the settings and choice of effects shown here are going to be largely subjective, but much of the routing and underlying principals will help give you a solid jumping off point in making your mixes and sounds more diverse, interesting and personal..

  • Quick Tip: Use Multiple Audio Interfaces on Mac OS X

    20. Quick Tip: Use Multiple Audio Interfaces on Mac OS X

    Author: Hector Lee

    This is a true gem for Mac users especially when most DAWs do not allow you to use multiple audio interfaces. This can be very useful if you have multiple audio interfaces and want to use them together for more simultaneous inputs and outputs. I am sorry about this tutorial will only apply to Macs so Windows users are out of luck.

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